​​The Art of Communication

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” – George Bernard Shaw  

Scott Walsh

 Have you ever tried to have a conversation with somebody and you felt the need to interject before they could finish? How about checking your phone in the middle of a conversation? In either case, you are not present in the moment. An exchange of viewpoints is supposed to be taking place, but when fail to be present, then you fail to provide an adequate response.   Continue reading

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Why Workplace Friendships Are Not So Bad for Business

Photo: @photosbyphab from nappy

 

“As company family picnics declined, so did the social interaction in the workplace.”

Earlier, I came across the article, Having Work Friends Can Be Tricky, But It’s Worth It,” which I found to be interesting. The most interesting part was the statistics on co-workers vacationing together. “Going on a vacation with a co-worker is virtually unimaginable in America—less than 6 percent of workers have taken their relationship with colleagues to this level.”  

A few weeks ago, I returned from vacation with four other people, one of which is a friend I met through work. So now I fit into that “less than 6 percent” category, and if you know me, you would never think I would. I like to keep small circles and I am not the social butterfly, so when I go to a new company, I do what is asked of me and go home. Having numerous side hustles when I was younger, I always had the “business is business, friends are friends” mentality, and it still holds true to this day. You have to have the same mentality in the workplace, which also allows you to quickly get over any grievances you have with someone that you forged a friendship with through work. This is something that many athletes that play on teams learn early on. You get into a fight with a teammate during practice, you leave it on the field and you do not carry that grudge forward. I was reminded of this again my freshman year in college after getting into a fight with a junior during football training camp.  Read More

 

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Career Fair Do’s and Don’ts

In a previous article, I talked about having that game plan so that you know how to tackle the Internship/Career Fairs. Let’s talk about the day of, and issues I have seen with how candidates approach employers.

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Be Ready To Rock Internship and Career Fairs

“Confidence comes from knowing what you’re doing. If you are prepared for something, you usually do it. If not, you usually fall flat on your face.” – Tom Landry

 

Internship and Career Fair season is stressful for both attendees and employers. The employers must make sure that they have all the information for any handouts, materials for table setup, presentations, and of course the marketing swag that some attendees grab even if they do not visit with that company, so you need to do your part and show up prepared as well. A few years ago, I started working for a new corporation and part of my reason for accepting this offer, instead of the others, was that it would allow me to start an internship/mentorship program and speak to local high school and college students about starting their careers. Having been on both ends, I have a different perspective on how to approach the situation, although one size does not fit all.

This article is intended to help you prepare to arrive ready to show up and show out meaning you are confident when speaking, and able to captivate potential employers. You do want to be memorable, right?

What is the game plan? Continue reading

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Always Run from Risks. Said No One Ever.

Freddie Marriage

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” T. S. Elliot

Failure to innovate or take risks can eventually take down the most successful companies. Throughout history, there have been countless companies on top of their industry that did not stand the test of time. The same time that allowed competition to take advantage of and adopt new technologies. Although Blockbuster met its demise for several reasons, failure to innovate would be in the top three. In 2000, the CEO of Blockbuster was approached by the founder of Netflix with a proposal to form a partnership. Blockbuster was doing so well, and they already had their recipe for success, so they did not do the analysis and failed to connect the unseen factors. When companies are consistently increasing revenue with little to no change in the business model, it is often harder for them to embrace strategic thinkers. How long will the success of your current strategic initiative prevent you from failing? Continue reading

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Reaching & Teaching Across the Aisle: A Solution to Construction Labor Shortage

“We can raise the talent bar, but you have to do something different. You can’t do what you are currently doing today.” – Lou Adler

A continuing downward trend for the construction industry has been the lack of skilled labor workers. The recession cost hundreds of thousands their jobs between 2006 and 2011. Looking for more stability, most of those workers went on to other industries, while others struggled to find work years after being laid off. If you look at the unemployment rate, many people are looking for a job, but why does the construction industry continue to struggle?

There was a time when construction industries had to worry about not having the work available to keep employees busy; now they struggle to bring in workers to fill jobs. This industry challenge tributes to the number one concern for the construction industry: not enough qualified workers. During the 50s and 60s, unskilled labor was the norm, but was down to less than 30 percent by the time the recession hit. Per the AGC of America, construction firms are pushing for more qualified workers.

“Construction firms seem particularly concerned with the quantity and quality of local construction education and training programs. Nationwide, 55 percent of businesses say the local pipeline for preparing new craft workers is below average or poor. Meanwhile, 35 percent of firms have a low opinion of the local pipeline for construction professionals.”  Continue reading

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Three Construction Trends to Think About in 2017

Construction industry professionals have slowed down with the winter months. It is the time of year to start focusing and strategically planning on how to get the most out of the opportunities in 2017. Let’s look at three trends to watch this year.

With the continued growth in the economy, nonresidential construction will continue to grow as well.

In 2017, the forecast for nonresidential construction is predicted to go up 6.5% compared to 5.6% in 2016. Although there has been continued growth in the economy, there is still a lot of uncertainty in how long it can be sustained. As stated in the new U.S. Construction Outlook Heading into 2017 from ContructConnect, this is partially due to the presidential election. Job growth is expected to go up in the

U. S., especially with the push to bring jobs back from overseas. Combine that with low-interest rates and continued population growth, the need for more construction will continue to increase.

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